prostheticknowledge

prostheticknowledge:

Shakespeare.txt.jpg

Project by Tom Scott takes scanned jpeg image files of Romeo & Juliet play and presents the reinterpreted text from image compression in print:

JPEG image compression is lossy. Every time you edit and save a picture, some of the original content is lost. But it’s difficult to see that with the naked eye, so I compressed Shakespeare instead.

“O Romep+ Rpldo wiepffnre arr!riov Romep@
Dgoy thz gatggr `me tefusf sgx n`me!”

That’s the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet, compressed at “maximum” quality in Photoshop: I loaded the text as a RAW, then outputted the compressed file back to plain text.

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infinity-imagined
pappubahry:

The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.
Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.
Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

pappubahry:

The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.

Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.

Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

prostheticknowledge

prostheticknowledge:

Depth Blur Webapps

A couple of projects that explore your photos taken with the recently updated Android camera app and it’s Depth Blur feature.

As mentioned last week, the new Android camera app can now compute depth maps with the taken image for photo manipulation, particularly to create depth-of-field like effects. Some coders have been playing around with this feature so that people can play around with the images.

DEPTHY (top GIF) by Rafał Lindemann is a lot smoother than some of the other attempts at the same thing - click an area to add focus and move the cursor to alter the ‘perspective’. [Link]

Depth data viewer by Jaume Sanchez Elias takes the data and attempts to display the image as a 3D scene. It isn’t a perfect representation and depends on how well the original photo was taken, but it certainly is interesting where the results are taken too. [Link]

FYI - For iOS users, it maybe worth checking out the Seene app which does something very similar